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City Girls Reveal What They Bought After Signing Their Record Deal

Written by on April 15, 2021

City Girls have come a long way.

The Miami rap duo, consisting of Yung Miami (Caresha Brownlee) and JT (Jatavia Johnson), reflected on their “journey from the projects of Miami to Nobu Beverly Hills” while speaking with Megan Thee Stallion for Interview magazine.

During their conversation, the “Savage” rapper recalled the moment she became a City Girls fan. “I remember the first time I ever heard y’all. I was like, ‘Oh my god, these bitches is it,’” she said. “I feel like I’m ratchet, but I was definitely like, ‘Okay, this is a whole different accent. This is a whole different style. This is a whole different experience.’ I’ve been a fan ever since.”

Megan also asked them to share the first thing they bought after signing their record deal with Quality Control.

Caresha said she spent her check on a Range Rover (“I got that Range”), while JT used the money to help her then-boyfriend, who was facing jail time.

“At the time, girl, I was so hood. I think I gave my ex-boyfriend some money for his lawyer and he still went to jail for a long-ass time,” recalled JT. “Whew, girl, I hate him. Other than that, I don’t remember. I was just spending money fast. I ain’t going to lie.”

They also revealed their favorite topics to rap about. “My pussy, of course. Money, ni**as, and every now and then I’ve got to throw my kids in there,” said Yung Miami, who has two children.

As for JT? “I like to rap about money, stealing, ni**as, scamming, and my struggle with prison,” she said.

The group, whose second studio album City on Lock was released last summer, also spoke about revisiting their early music and how they were less afraid to speak their mind when they first started out.

“I was just sending Caresha some songs we did in 2018, and I was like, ‘We got to redo these songs because we ain’t give a f**k what we said,’” said JT. “When you get in an industry and you start hearing other people’s music and start looking at the charts and start reading the comments, you try to be more like what you think is going to sell more than what is truly yourself. When I was sending her these songs, I was like, ‘Caresha, we got to redo these songs because this is us right here. This was us when we had nothing to lose, when we had no money. This was us.’ It’s hard to stick to that sound, though, as you grow.”